Insurance claim or case example

Learning Pods – Insurance Risks explained

As parents across the U.S. and Canada grapple with their children’s return to school amid a pandemic, “learning pods” have emerged as a potential solution to meeting kids’ academic and social needs while minimizing contact with large groups.

Two mothers in Delaware County, Ohio recently launched Web Student Services, LLC, a learning pod startup that pairs certified teachers with limited groups, or “pods” of students to facilitate an at-home school curriculum on public grounds. The company has already enrolled more than 70 families, most of whom pay about $90 per week.

Other parents are organizing learning pods with neighbors and hiring tutors or nannies to support their children’s online learning at different homes each week. Others are enrolling in commercial programs, either at existing child care or tutoring centers or other facilities—like fitness centers—that have reconfigured their traditional model to offer child care and learning support services for school-aged children.

Despite widespread need and the potential for revenue these new ventures are not without risk.Read More »Learning Pods – Insurance Risks explained

Ordinance or Law Insurance Coverage

Generally, Ordinance or Law insurance coverage provides limited protection for costs associated with repairing, rebuilding, or constructing a structure when physical damage to the structure by a covered cause of loss triggers an ordinance or law.

According to Adjuster’s International Disaster Recovery Consulting, compliance with ordinances and laws after a loss can add 50% or more to the cost of the claim*.

Insureds should take a proactive approach to their insurance program and the coverage provided by the program. Learning about important exclusions and limitations after a catastrophe strike will cause the Insured to experience frustration and anxiety. Insureds should always read their policies, and in some states, may be required by law to do so.

Ordinance or Law Exclusion

Most property insurance policies will have an Ordinance or Law exclusion. The exclusion applies to both physical damage and time element coverage.Read More »Ordinance or Law Insurance Coverage

Potential Exposures for Construction Owners ​​​​​​​​​​​​​

Potential Exposures for Construction OwnersAs always with construction projects, it is important that owners of new developments understand insurance coverage to ensure that there is adequate insurance to address any potential risks during and after the construction of the project. While most owners maintain commercial general liability policies or rely on project-specific policies, these policies may not fully protect the owner against any and all risks that they may face during and after construction. This article addresses two unique areas in which owners should take special note to ensure that they are covered for these particular risks: third party action over claims and products-completed operations coverage.

 

Third Party Action Over Claims

Owner contracts with Roofer to assist in the construction of the roof of a commercial building. During construction, Roofer’s employee falls and injures himself on the project site and collects workers’ compensation benefits under Roofer’s workers’ compensation policy. Typically, Owner would not consider any risks with respect to this injury as Owner required Roofer, in the subcontract, to maintain workers’ compensation insurance. However, despite receiving workers’ compensation benefits, Roofer’s employee files an action against Owner alleging negligence for failing to properly maintain a safe work site.The action filed by Roofer’s employee is considered a third party action over claim. The employee is unable to sue Roofer because workers’ compensation is the employee’s exclusive remedy against his or her employer. Thus, the injured employee brings an action against Owner alleging that Owner’s negligence in failing to maintain the project site contributed to the employee’s injuries.
Read More »Potential Exposures for Construction Owners ​​​​​​​​​​​​​

Study: Opioid-Related Deaths Cut by 25% in Medical Marijuana States

Medical Marijuana InsuranceOpioid-Related Deaths Cut by 25% in Medical Marijuana States according to a new multi-institutional study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine and led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, which examined the rate of deaths caused by opioid overdoses between 1999 and 2010. Results reveal that on average, the 13 states allowing the use of medical marijuana had a 24.8 percent lower annual opioid overdose mortality rate after the laws were enacted than states without the laws, indicating that the alternative treatment may be safer for patients suffering from chronic pain related to cancer and other conditions.

Opioid analgesics, such as OxyContin, Percocet and Vicodin, are prescribed for moderate to severe pain, and work by suppressing a person’s perception of pain. Approximately 60 percent of all deaths resulting from opioid analgesic overdoses occur in patients who have legitimate prescriptions. Additionally, the proportion of patients in the United States who are prescribed opioids for non-cancer pain has almost doubled over the past decade, indicating the need to do a more focused examination on the safety and efficacy of these and other treatment options. In states allowing the use of medical cannabis, the drugs may be prescribed as an alternative to opioids.
Read More »Study: Opioid-Related Deaths Cut by 25% in Medical Marijuana States

Report: New Emerging Risks

Report New Emerging RisksSwiss Re has released a report – ”New emerging risk insights,” which is based on the reinsurer’s SONAR process, described as a “unique tool which uses Swiss Re’s internal risk management expertise to observe and evaluate new and emerging risks.”

Some of the other emerging risks examined in the SONAR report includes the following:

  • Cloud computing security
  • Contagious emerging market crisis
  • Eurozone crisis leading to deflation
  • Short-termism of macro-policy measures
  • Air pollution as mortality driver
  • Concussion crisis in sports
  • Democratisation of genetic testing
  • Digital slander
  • E-cigarettes
  • Financial consumer protection regulation
  • From closed to open business models
  • Food and water safety: trade-offs with growthRead More »Report: New Emerging Risks

Negative Review and Freedom of Speech

Are you buying a fair amount of goods or services online and sometimes wish to leave a negative review? Do you always read the ToS fine print? Have you heard of a so called “disparagement clause”?

If you own a business and are exposed to online reviews think twice before adding disparagement clause to your ToS contract, as such can be found as violating rights of free speech.

Read More »Negative Review and Freedom of Speech

Commercial Kitchen Fire Safety

commercial grade kitchen equipmentOperation of a commercial grade kitchen, many safety considerations should be addressed, including food safety, employee and volunteer safety, and fire safety. This blog post addresses the specific issues associated with providing adequate fire safety for your kitchen.

Commercial cooking operations are defined as kitchens that have cooking equipment that produce grease and grease laden vapors. This includes flat grills, char broilers and deep fat fryers. The typical residential range (electric or gas) would not be considered a grease producing appliance. Other equipment, such as ovens, microwaves and steam kettles also fall into the non-grease producing appliance category. The following is information regarding two of the most common types of equipment that produce grease and/or grease laden vapors.

Deep Fat Fryers

Deep fat fryers are a major cause of kitchen fires. Oil can splash and easily come into contact with an open flame from an adjacent piece of cooking equipment, such as a gas-fired range top. A 18-inch clearance must be maintained between the deep fat fryer and the open flame cooking equipment. If a 18-inch clearance is not possible, a vertical steel barrier extending 12 inches above the top of the deep fat fryer or open flame appliance(s) can be used as an alternative means of protection.Read More »Commercial Kitchen Fire Safety

Tips for avoiding slip, trip and fall accidents

Slips, trips and falls are a leading cause of injury for businesses and workplaces. Employees and other parties on your premises – visitors, customers, vendors, contractors and subcontractors – could be at risk for this type of accident or injury.

It is a common misconception that slip and fall injuries “just happen” and that there is little that can be done to prevent them. Years of experience show that proper slip, trip and fall prevention can help in reducing the number of injuries and in reducing loss costs.

Slips-Trips-Falls

Read More »Tips for avoiding slip, trip and fall accidents

Preventing offline identity fraud

offline identity fraudIdentity fraud does not always begin online. According to Travelers claim data, 44 percent of ID fraud cases happen when a person’s purse or wallet has been lost or stolen. Because thieves can use the information they find inside, here are some ways to help protect yourself and your identity.

Watch your wallet and purse
Many people store personal information in their purses and wallets, making it easier for thieves to commit identity fraud. Help secure your identity by keeping your purse and wallet in a safe place and carrying only essentials when you go out. Leave credit cards you will not be using in a secure place at home. Unless it is absolutely necessary, avoid carrying Social Security cards, birth certificates or passports as they contain key pieces of personal information thieves could use to steal your identity.Read More »Preventing offline identity fraud

Proper fire extinguisher use

You should know exactly how to use a fire extinguisher in the event a fire develops and you feel you are safely able to fight it. It is recommended that only those trained in the proper use of fire extinguishers consider using them when appropriate.

Call for help before attempting to extinguish a fire. A fire may grow out of control more quickly than you anticipate. It is wise to have help on the way.

Determine a safe evacuation path before approaching the fire. Do not allow the fire, heat or smoke to come between you and your evacuation path.

Attack the fire using the PASS method:Read More »Proper fire extinguisher use